News & Publications

Wound care news hand-picked for you.

May
14

Ask the Expert: A healthy foot is a happy foot

Right now, 6.7 million Americans are living with a chronic ulcer or open sore, and more than two million of those are suffering from a diabetic foot ulcer. This National Foot Health Awareness Month, take a moment to stand up for your feet by learning more about proper foot care and ulcer prevention.

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May
14

Microscopic oxygen bubbles could help improve cancer therapeutics and accelerate wound healing

A Purdue University-patented technology shows promise in using microscopic bubbles filled with oxygen to help with various medical treatments, including improving cancer therapeutics and helping wounds heal faster. Samara Biotech LLC, a Purdue startup, has developed an easy-to-use method to inject oxygen “nanobubbles” intravenously so they can be targeted precisely at wounds or cancerous tumors.

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May
14

UVA Entrepreneurship Team Wins ACC Competition

Led by Ashwinraj Karthikeyan, a fourth-year student in the School of Engineering and Applied Science, the squad won first place and earned the People’s Choice award at the ACC InVenture Prize competition on Friday night at the Ferst Center for the Arts at Georgia Institute of Technology.

Going up against teams from every ACC school except Clemson University, Karthikeyan pitched a wound site dressing called Phoenix-Aid, which he designed to help diabetic foot ulcer patients.

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May
14

Doctor’s Orders: Leeches and maggots and your health

I first learned about the value of maggots and their use in the care of diabetic wounds at a conference. A primary care physician from Appalachia told me how a patient arrived at the primary care physician’s office with her foot wrapped in gauze. When the nursing staff removed the gauze, they noted the wound was teaming with maggots!

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May
14

Cool research: Pressure sore closed with frozen placenta

Cryopreserved membrane from human placentas helped close a hard-to-heal pressure wound in a series of case studies reported in the March issue of Wounds.

Though the bene­fits of using human amniotic tissue are well documented, the doctors wanted to explore the bene­fits of using cryopreserved, or frozen, tissue on three types of wounds under-represented in previous studies. They focused on treatment of an arterial ulcer, a pressure ulcer, and a recurring immune-related pyoderma gangrenosum ulcer.

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